dandelion roots

Here is the second of my offerings for Poetics night at dVerse, which I am hosting this evening.

 

we drove off the end of the road

some way back.

beyond the daisies

pushed up proudly

 

|: rigid

 

booted buckets ring out

discordant songs.

drowned her song

you know, that

 

|: lady

 

scything the night.

throwing spoons in the corner.

leaving her feathers to go wake

under the cypress

 

|: tree

 

brings bough to fashion

wooden night clothes

peg out on silver chord

stretched to the other neighborhood

 

|: watch

 

ticks it’s last tock

kicks empty space

hands in the key

umbrella’s all close |: in

 

the end

 

Notes:

|: repeat the word once more

In many cultures there are different euphemisms/metaphors for Death. This poem was constructed using a number of them along with some of my own.

Gospa s koso ga/jo je obiskala – the lady with a scythe has visited him/her (Slovene)

Heittää lusikka nurkkaan – to throw a spoon in the corner (Finnish)

Potkaista tyhjää – to kick empty space (Finnish)

Svegliarsi sotto a un cipresso – to wake up under a cypress (Italian)

Lasciarci le penne – to leave one’s feathers (Italian)

Vestir pijama de madeira — to wear wooden pajamas (Portugese)

Irse al otro barrio – to move/go to the other neighborhood (Spanish)

Manger les pissenlits par la racine — to eat dandelions by the roots (Hungarian)

De Schirm zue tue —To close the umbrella (Swiss)

Manger les pissenlits par la racine — to eat dandelions by the roots (French)

 

 

 

 

 

27 responses to “dandelion roots

  1. I love this kind of wordplay, Paul – very British! I especially enjoyed:
    ‘booted buckets ring out
    discordant songs.
    drowned her song
    you know, that
    |: lady’
    and
    ‘wooden night clothes
    peg out on silver chord’.

  2. And here in America we have cultures that will say, She passed…he passed away…instead of death or died. Especially here in the Southern US. and there is the River Lethe and the Japanese mono no aware and the word shi for death. Karoshi – ironic Japanese word for working oneself to death – only in Japan.

  3. Wow! I am still learning, (Geography), the only one I picked up on was “booted buckets ring out”, re origin, as for the others, a lesson learned, thank you…

  4. I, too, dug /sything the night/. I kept trying to create cohesion out of /rigid–lady–tree–watch/ BUT your musical interlude & international explication dashed my doubts Soothed my psyche. Loved your prompt so much, I used your prompt title for my poem–& I never do that. I love your unique & talented approach to poetics & art & philosophy. I feel closer to you with each passing week; thanks

    • Feeling is mutual Glenn. I did contemplate linking those four words but in the end used a repeat symbol form music score to suggest each of the four be repeated, linking the stanzas..I would have used the symbol after each word but it came up as a smiley emoticon. Go figure.

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